Staff

 

kerwinDonald M. Kerwin, Jr., Executive Director

Donald M. Kerwin, Jr. has directed the Center for Migration Studies (CMS) of New York since September 2011. Between 1992 and 2008, he worked for the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC), including for 15 years as it Executive Director (ED). Upon his arrival at CLINIC in 1992, Mr. Kerwin coordinated CLINIC’s political asylum project for Haitians. Mr. Kerwin returned to CLINIC as its interim ED between September 2012 and March 2013. CLINIC, a subsidiary of the US Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), is a public interest legal corporation that supports a national network of more than 220 charitable legal programs for immigrants.

Between 2008 and 2011, Mr. Kerwin served as Vice-President for Programs at the Migration Policy Institute (MPI), where wrote on immigration, labor standards, and refugee policy issues.  He has also served as an associate fellow at the Woodstock Theological Center where he co-directed Woodstock’s Theology of Migration Project; a member of the American Bar Association’s Commission on Immigration; on the Council on Foreign Relations’ Immigration Task Force; a board member for Jesuit Refugee Services-USA; a board member for the Capital Area Immigrant Rights Coalition; an advisor to the USCCB Committee on Migration; and on numerous advisory groups. Mr. Kerwin is a non-resident senior fellow at MPI and on the board of directors for the Border Network for Human Rights in El Paso, Texas.

 

Lydio TomasiReverend Lydio F. Tomasi, C.S., Ph.D., Executive Director Emeritus

Father Lydio F. Tomasi is a founding member of the Center for Migration Studies and directed the agency from 1968 to 2001.  During his tenure at CMS, Father Tomasi was the founding editor of Migration World Magazine, a bi-monthly review of current issues in migration policy. He was also editor of the annual volume, In Defense of the Alien, the proceedings of an annual conference held on immigrants’ rights and immigration policy. His younger brother and CMS co-founder, Archbishop Silvano Tomasi, is the Permanent Observer of the Holy See at the United Nations and Specialized Organizations in Geneva, Switzerland.

Born in Vincenza, Italy, Father Tomasi entered the Scalabrinian Seminary for high school in Brescia and college in Como. After his noviciate in Treviso, he attended the Pontifical Gregorian University of Rome, where he earned his Philosophy and Theology Licenses and was ordained priest by Cardinal Confalonieri on December 16, 1962.  In May 1984, he received his Ph.D. in Philosophy from New York University.

After his ordination, Father Tomasi was assigned as instructor of Systematic Philosophy and History at St. Charles Seminary in Staten Island, New York.  In 1967, Father Tomasi served as Parochial Vicar at the Church of St. Michael in New Haven, Connecticut.  He subsequently served for four years as Pastor of the Church of St. Joseph located in Lower Manhattan in the heart of New York City Chinatown, where he had an opportunity to test theories of immigrant incorporation, multicultural congregations, and the institutional role of churches in the adjustment process of immigrants.

On January 15, 2006, Father Tomasi was appointed Pastor of Holy Rosary Church in Washington D.C. by his Provincial Superior of the Missionaries of St. Charles-Scalabrinians and by His Eminence Theodore Cardinal McCarrick, Archbishop of Washington. He served in that position through June 2013.

In 1985, the President of the Republic of Italy bestowed on Father Tomasi the title of Cavaliere Ufficiale in the Order of Merit of the Republic of Italy.  In 1991, the Rotary Club made Father Tomasi a Paul Harris Fellow. In 1993, the Order Sons of Italy in America bestowed on Father Tomasi the Children of Columbus Award. In 1996, Father Tomasi was the recipient of the prestigious International Prize “Guido Durso”, sponsored by the journal Politica Meridionalista of the University of Naples.

 

Ellen Percy Kraly, Editor of the International Migration Review

Ellen Percy Kraly was appointed Editor for the International Migration Review in November 2011.  Professor Kraly is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Geography at Colgate University.  She holds a M.Sc. in demography from The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and earned her Ph.D. from Fordham University in sociology with an emphasis in population studies.  Her published scholarship has addressed the relationship between immigration and US population dynamics and environment, emigration, international migration statistics, refugee policy and resettlement, immigrant incorporation, and population data systems and human rights.  Kraly was a member of the National Academy of Sciences Panel on Immigration Statistics and has prepared reports on topics including international migration data and immigration policies for the United Nations Statistical Commission, National Academy of Sciences, US Immigration and Naturalization Service, US Census Bureau and US Commission on Immigration Reform.  She has an active research program, teaches courses in geography, environmental studies, peace and conflict studies and sociology at Colgate University, and serves on the board of directors of numerous non-profit organizations.

 

Daniela Alulema

Daniela Alulema, Administrative Coordinator

Daniela Alulema is a graduate student in the Urban Policy Analysis and Management Program at the New School. She obtained her bachelor’s degree in Accounting from Baruch College, CUNY in 2007. Daniela currently serves as a board member in the New York State Youth Leadership Council, where she also served as media and budgeting coordinator from 2009 to 2011. Originally from Quito, Ecuador, Daniela is fluent in Spanish and enjoys to travel.

 

 

Breana George, Research Coordinator

Breana George received a Master of Public Administration degree from New York University’s Wagner Graduate School of Public Service with a specialization in international policy.  At NYU, she conducted research for the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ Institute for Mexicans Abroad on transnational labor certification and training for Mexican migrant workers in the United States. Prior to graduate study, Breana served as a researcher and academic program manager at the University of California, Santa Cruz, from where she holds a Bachelors of Arts. At the UC Center for Justice, Tolerance and Community, she collaborated with faculty and community based organizations to carry out research and program evaluation in such areas as environmental justice and immigrants and the digital divide. In addition, she supported the implementation of the Summer Institute for Social Change Across Borders, a project that brought together grassroots leaders from both Latin America and Latino communities in the United States to build knowledge on social justice organizing. From this project, Breana has participated extensively in the work of human rights groups in Mexico City. She is fluent in Spanish.

 

J. Rachel Reyes, Communications Coordinator

Rachel Reyes received her Juris Doctorate from the University of San Francisco, and is an admitted attorney to the State Bar of California. Focusing on women’s rights and displacement, Rachel has: drafted motions and organized high-level conferences with the Committee on Migration, Refugees and Population at the Council of Europe; advocated for protections for refugee and internally displaced women at the 53rd Session on the Commission on the Status of Women with Human Rights Advocates; spearheaded fundraising campaigns to fund legal aid programs in Thailand and Ecuador for Asylum Access; and assisted in the rebuilding of PeaceWomen Project to better provide news, resources and events surrounding issues of women, peace and security. She also worked with Global Justice Center to help develop legal arguments regarding the deliberate transmission of HIV in armed conflict.

Rachel authored “Deliver Us from our Protectors: Accountability for Violations Committed by Humanitarian Aid Staff against Refugee Women and Children” which was published in the summer 2009 edition of the University of San Francisco Law Review. Rachel also holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Master of Arts in International Affairs (concentrating on conflict and security and governance and rights) from The New School.

 

Mary Brown, Archivist

Mary Brown first came to CMS in 1979 to work on a dissertation on the intersection of Italian immigration and New York City Catholicism, which eventually resulted in the CMS publication Churches, Communities and Children.  Dr. Brown has been associated with CMS since then, first as a researcher writing parish community studies and editing book-length memoirs for publication, and since 1995 as an archivist processing collections and answering researchers’ questions.  She also serves as the archivist and as an adjunct professor at Marymount Manhattan College.

 

moralesCatalina Morales, Bookkeeper

Catalina Morales received her Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting at Lehman College of the City University of New York. She also studied Italian Literature at Bologna University in Italy. A native of Cuba, she migrated to Venezuela then Puerto Rico and finally arrived in the United States in 1967. Her experience extends over 26 years in various industries as an accountant. Her area of expertise is financial analysis.

 

Fellows

Bob Warren

Robert Warren, Senior Visiting Fellow

Robert Warren served as a demographer for 34 years with the United States Census Bureau and the former Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS).  He served as Director of the INS’s Statistics Division from 1986 to 1995. One of his accomplishments at INS was to project accurate ranges of the number of unauthorized immigrants that would apply in each state under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA).  During his service, he also worked for three years with the staff of the Panel on Immigration Statistics of the National Academy of Sciences, which published the report, “Immigration Statistics: A Story of Neglect” co-edited with Daniel B. Levine and Kenneth Hill (National Academy Press, 1985).  Mr. Warren retired from INS in January 2002.  Currently, Mr. Warren is developing methodology for assigning legal status to non-U.S. citizens counted in the Census Bureau’s annual American Community Survey.  Detailed social and economic data on unauthorized immigrants is expected to be publicly available at sub-national levels

Mr. Warren recently released “Unauthorized Immigration to the United States: Annual Estimates and Components of Change, by State, 1990 to 2010,” with John Robert Warren in the International Migration Review, Vol. 47, No. 2, Summer 2013.  His other signature publications include: “Annual Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population Residing in the United States, by State: 1990 to 2000,” (Department of Homeland Security, 2003); “Estimates of the Undocumented Immigrant Population Residing in the United States: October 1996,” (INS, 1997); “Determinants of Unauthorized Migration to the United States,” with Linda S. Peterson (Center for International Research (CIR), U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1990); and “A Count of the Uncountable: Estimates of Undocumented Aliens Counted in the 1980 United States Census,” with Jeffrey S. Passel, Demography, Vol. 24, No. 3, August 1987.

Mr. Warren has testified before Congress concerning the estimation of undocumented immigration and served as an expert witness for the Department of Justice on the issue of educating undocumented children. He was the U.S. representative at United Nations meetings on immigration statistics in Geneva in May 1986 and February 1991, and an advisor to the U.S. Commission on Agricultural Workers in 1992.  For three years, Mr. Warren also played professional baseball in the Chicago White Sox organization.  He holds a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Science in Education from Indiana State University.