New from IMR: Immigrant Experiences in North America, Western Europe and Australia
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New from IMR: Immigrant Experiences in North America, Western Europe and Australia

The fall 2016 edition of the International Migration Review (IMR) is now available online and in print through paid or institutional subscription. This edition includes a series of papers on immigrants in Western Europe, including a paper on the educational performance of immigrants in Western European countries and papers on variables that influence anti-immigrant attitudes. Other articles explore immigrant experiences in North America and Australia, including participation in unions, educational expectations and attainment, health, and factors that help or hinder US undocumented youth in applying for temporary relief from deportation through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The edition also includes eight new book reviews which, as always, are open access (freely available) for three years from the date of publication.

Some highlights from the fall 2016 edition include:

Does Where I Live Affect Whether I Apply? The Contextual Determinants of Applying for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals

Tom K. Wong and Angela S. García

The DACA program provides temporary relief from deportation and work authorization for eligible undocumented youth in the United States. This study investigates the factors that help or hinder undocumented youth in applying for DACA.  It that: (1) more immigrant-serving organizations in a state leads to more applications; (2) hostile policy climates in some states do not significantly impact DACA implementation; and (3) socioeconomic factors are most significantly related to decisions to apply for DACA.  In identifying the factors that influence DACA applications, the authors demonstrate that the opportunities and barriers present in receiving communities shape undocumented youths’ decisions to regularize their immigration status, which has significant implications for how they are incorporated into American society.

The Immigrant Advantage in Adolescent Educational Expectations

Cynthia Feliciano and Yader R. Lanuza

In the United States, research has shown that immigrant children from multiple racial/ethnic backgrounds have higher educational ambitions compared to their native-born peers, and that this higher ambition is correlated with educational achievement. However, existing studies have not focused on the reasons why the children of immigrants have high educational expectations, compared to their native-born counterparts or if the trend has changed over time. This study shows that while children of immigrants and native-born children now have similar expectations to earn a college degree, children of immigrants have a higher expectation to attain a graduate education due to higher parental expectations, greater interest in school, and foreign-language use in early childhood. The paper argues that these factors can be conceptualized as forms of “cultural capital” stemming from unique aspects of the immigrant experience that are common across immigrant families.

The full table of contents for the fall 2016 issue of IMR is available below:

IMMIGRANTS IN WESTERN EUROPE: EDUCATION, MARRIAGE, ATTITUDES, AND UNEMPLOYMENT

Ethnic Composition and School Performance in the Secondary Education of Turkish Migrant Students in Seven Countries and 19 European Educational Systems
Jean Beaman

Consanguineous Marriage in Turkish Families in Turkey and in Western Europe
Helen Baykara-Krumme

Party Discourse and Prejudiced Attitudes toward Migrants in Western Europe at the Beginning of the 2000s
Roman Careja

A Foreigner Who Does Not Steal My Job: The Role of Unemployment Risk and Values in Attitudes toward Equal Opportunities
Marco Pecoraro and Didier Ruedin

Is Money Enough?: The Effect of Migrant Remittances on Parental Aspirations and Youth Educational Attainment in Rural Mexico
Adam Sawyer

IMMIGRANT EXPERIENCES IN NORTH AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA: UNIONIZATION, DACA, WEIGHT, EDUCATIONAL EXPECTATIONS, AND MATERNAL DEPRESSION

Unionization and Income Growth of Racial Minority Immigrants in Canada: A Longitudinal Study
Anil Verma, Jeffrey G. Reitz and Rupa Banerjee

Does Where I Live Affect Whether I Apply? The Contextual Determinants of Applying for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals
Tom K. Wong and Angela S. García

Migration Decisions, Acculturation, and Overweight among Asian and Latino Immigrant Adults in the United States
Bridget K. Gorman, Cynthia Novoa and Rachel Tolbert Kimbro

The Immigrant Advantage in Adolescent Educational Expectations
Cynthia Feliciano and Yader R. Lanuza

Birthing, Nativity, and Maternal Depression: Australia and the United States
Melissa L. Martinson and Marta Tienda

BOOK REVIEWS

Global Talent: Skilled Labor as Social Capital in Korea by Gi-Wook Shin and Joon Nak Choi
Keumjae Park

Race on the Move: Brazilian Migrants and the Global Reconstruction of Race by Tiffany D. Joseph
Nadia Y. Kim

Life Interrupted: Trafficking into Forced Labor in the United States by Denise Brennan
Sverre Molland

Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor by Nicole Constable
Maria Platt

Corazón de Dixie: Mexicanos in the U.S. South Since 1910 by Julie Weise
Mark Overmyer-Velázquez

Deported: Immigrant Policing, Disposable Labor, and Global Capitalism by Tanya Maria Golash-Boza
Richard Velázquez

Elusive Jannah: The Somali Diaspora and a Borderless Muslim Identity by Cawo Abdi
Beatrice Akua-Sakyiwah

Immigration Judges and U.S. Asylum Policy by Banks Miller, Linda Camp Keith and Jennifer Holmes
Cosmas Ukachukwu Ikegwuruka