New from IMR: Immigration and Integration in the United States and Europe, and Migrants and Mortality in Greece and the United States

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New from IMR: Immigration and Integration in the United States and Europe, and Migrants and Mortality in Greece and the United States

The Fall 2017 edition of the International Migration Review (IMR) is now available online and in print through paid or institutional subscription. This edition includes a series of papers on immigration and integration in the United States and Europe, including papers on immigrant bilingualism in Spain and student emigration to the United States. Other articles explore migrants and mortality in Greece and in new destinations in the United States. This edition also includes eight new book reviews which are always made open access and freely available for three years from the date of publication.

Some highlights from the Fall 2017 edition include:

Foreign Student Emigration to the United States: Pathways of Entry, Demographic Antecedents, and Origin-Country Contexts
Kevin J. A. Thomas and Christopher Inkpen

This study analyzes trends in international student migration to the United States between 1992 and 2010. The study finds that shifts in students’ modes of entry have played a role in the growth of the foreign student population in the United States. Overall growth in student migration stemmed from an increase in students using visas that offered the least possibility of US employment after graduation. The study also finds that overall student migration trends were significantly affected by global demographic changes. Decreasing student emigration from Europe was due to declining fertility trends, percentage of youths, and youth population size. In Asia and Africa, the large youth population explained much of the student migration increases from these regions. The analysis also finds that English-speaking contexts have declined in importance as a reason for student migration.

Immigrant Bilingualism in Spain: An Asset or a Liability?
Maria Medvedeva and Alejandro Portes

This study contributes to the debate about the advantages and disadvantages of being a bilingual immigrant. It examines whether bilingual immigrant youths do better or worse academically than their monolingual peers. Using data from Spain, where close to half of immigrants speak Spanish as their native language, the study found no evidence of the disadvantages of bilingualism. Bilingual youths benefited from their linguistic skills. This advantage manifested as a direct pathway toward higher educational attainment.

Rethinking the Hispanic Paradox: The Mortality Experience of Mexican Immigrants in Traditional Gateways and New Destinations
Andrew Fenelon

This study examines the mortality rates of Mexican immigrants in the United States in traditional immigration destinations versus new and minor destinations. Mexican immigrants in new and minor immigration destinations have a significant survival advantage over those in traditional destinations. This finding casts doubt on the protective effects of enclaves, since non-traditional destinations have less established immigrant communities. Future research should reevaluate the relationship between community ethnic composition, social support, and immigrant health.

The full table of contents for the Fall 2017 issue of IMR is available below:

ISSUE INFORMATION

Table of Contents

MIGRANTS AND MORTALITY IN GREECE AND IN NEW DESTINATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES

Rethinking the Hispanic Paradox: The Mortality Experience of Mexican Immigrants in Traditional Gateways and New Destinations
Andrew Fenelon

Estimating Mortality Levels and Patterns among Natives, Immigrants, and Selected Ethnic Groups in Greece: 2010–2012
Georgia Verropoulou and Cleon Tsimbos

IMMIGRATION AND INTEGRATION IN EUROPE

Immigrant Bilingualism in Spain: An Asset or a Liability?
Maria Medvedeva and Alejandro Portes

The Influence of Partner Choice and Country of Origin Characteristics on the Naturalization of Immigrants in Sweden: A Longitudinal Analysis
Jonas Helgertz and Pieter Bevelander

Are Inter-Minority Contacts Guided by the Same Mechanisms as Minority–Majority Contacts? A Comparative Study of Two Types of Inter-Ethnic Ties in the Netherlands
Judith Koops, Borja Martinovic and Jeroen Weesie

IMMIGRATION AND INTEGRATION IN THE UNITED STATES

Multiplying Diversity: Family Unification and the Regional Origins of Late-Age US Immigrants
Marta Tienda

The Effect of Immigration from Mexico on Social Capital in the United States
Morris Levy

Foreign Student Emigration to the United States: Pathways of Entry, Demographic Antecedents, and Origin-Country Contexts
Kevin J. A. Thomas and Christopher Inkpen

BOOK REVIEWS (Open Access)

Borderlands: Towards an Anthropology of the Cosmopolitan Condition by Michel Agier
Luciano Baracco

Burnt by the Sun: The Koreans of the Russian Far East by Jon K. Chang
Zachary M. Adamz

From India to Israel: Identity, Immigration, and the Struggle for Religious Equality by Joseph Hodes
Ella Fratantuono

Gendered Asylum: Race and Violence in U.S. Law and Politics by Sara L. McKinnon
Stefan Vogler

The Last Best Place? Gender, Family and Migration in the New West by Leah Schmalzbauer
J. Dwight Hines

Mothers on the Move: Reproducing Belonging between Africa and Europe by Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg
Valentina Mazzucato

No Borders: The Politics of Immigration Control and Resistance by Natasha King
Mario Bruzzone

The Ideal Refugees: Gender, Islam, and the Sahrawi Politics of Survival by Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh; The Concerned Women of Buduburam: Refugee Activists and Humanitarian Dilemmas by Elizabeth Holzer
Elisabeth Olivius