New from IMR: Integration and Health-related Issues of Immigrants
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New from IMR: Integration and Health-related Issues of Immigrants

The Spring 2017 edition of the International Migration Review (IMR) is now available for free online through 2017 and in print through paid or institutional subscription. This edition includes a series of papers on immigrant integration, including a paper comparing social mobility and occupational attainment of Turks in Western Europe with Turks in Turkey and with Western European natives. Other articles explore health-related issues of immigrants in the United States. This edition also includes eight new book reviews which are always made open access and freely available for three years from the date of publication.

Some highlights from the Spring 2017 edition include:

Has Migration Been Beneficial for Migrants and Their Children?: Comparing Social Mobility of Turks in Western Europe, Turks in Turkey, and Western European Natives

Carolina V. Zuccotti, Harry B. G. Ganzeboom, and Ayse Guveli

This study compares the social mobility and occupational attainment of first- and second-generation Turks in Western Europe with Western European natives and Turks in Turkey. The analysis shows that second-generation Turks in Western European countries are more likely to acquire a higher education than Turks in Turkey. Moreover, they use this education in the Western European labor market, and are upwardly mobile compared to the first-generation. However, when comparing occupational attainment of second-generation Turks in Western Europe to their counterparts in Turkey, the results show that the same level of education leads to higher occupation in Turkey.

Second-Generation Decline or Advantage? Latino Assimilation in the Aftermath of the Great Recession

Van C. Tran, Nicol M. Valdez

This article examines post-recession assimilation among second-generation Latinos in the United States, based on data from the Current Population Survey (2008-2012). There are three major findings. First, second-generation Mexicans and Puerto Ricans are at a disadvantage in assimilating and attaining social mobility, whereas other Latinos have achieved parity with native peers. Second, second-generation Latinos report significant progress compared to their parents and there is no evidence of a second-generation decline. Third, there is no difference in socioeconomic outcomes among second-generation Mexicans by destination, whether rural or urban. Overall, these results yield an optimistic assessment of second-generation progress, while noting potential stagnation among third- and higher-generation Mexicans.

The full table of contents for the Spring 2017 issue of IMR is available below:

ISSUE INFORMATION

Table of Contents

HEALTH-RELATED ISSUES OF IMMIGRANTS IN THE UNITED STATES

Becoming Overweight without Gaining a Pound: Weight Evaluations and the Social Integration of Mexicans in the United States
Claire E. Altman, Jennifer Van Hook, and Jonathan Gonzalez

Does Life in the United States Take a Toll on Health? Duration of Residence and Birthweight among Six Decades of Immigrants
Julien Teitler, Melissa Martinson, and Nancy E. Reichman

Generational Peers and Alcohol Misuse
Michael Niño, Tianji Cai, Gabe Ignatow, and Philip Yang

IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION: ORIGIN AND DESTINATION SOCIETY PERSPECTIVES

Has Migration Been Beneficial for Migrants and Their Children?: Comparing Social Mobility of Turks in Western Europe, Turks in Turkey, and Western European Natives
Carolina V. Zuccotti, Harry B. G. Ganzeboom, and Ayse Guveli

Back to Square One: Socioeconomic Integration of Deported Migrants
Anda M. David

Second-Generation Decline or Advantage? Latino Assimilation in the Aftermath of the Great Recession
Van C. Tran, Nicol M. Valdez

Close Encounters: Minority and Majority Perceptions of Discrimination and Intergroup Relations in Antwerp, Belgium
Ahu Alanya, Marc Swyngedouw, Veronique Vandezande, and Karen Phalet

Does Size Really Matter? On the Relationship between Immigrant Group Size and Anti-Immigrant Prejudice
Yolande Pottie-Sherman and Rima Wilkes

How to Succeed in a Transnational Labor Market: Job Search and Wages among Hungarian, Slovak, and Czech Commuters in Austria
Roland Verwiebe, Christoph Reinprecht, Raimund Haindorfer, and Laura Wiesboeck

BOOK REVIEWS (Open Access)

Skills of the “Unskilled”: Work and Mobility among Mexican Migrants by Jacqueline Hagan
Jennifer A. Jones

At Home at Two Countries: The Past and Future of Dual Citizenship by Peter J. Spiro
Nikola Mirilovic

Exiled Home: Salvadoran Transnational Youth in the Aftermath of Violence by Susan Bibler Coutin
Sonja Wolf

The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World by Tara Zahra
Eli Lederhendler

Hometown Transnationalism: Long Distance Villageness among Indian Punjabis and North African Berbers by Thomas Lacroix
Martin Evans

Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America by Roberto G. Gonzales
Fanny Lauby

Migrant Women’s Voices. Talking About Life and Work in the UK Since 1945 by Linda McDowell
Karen Fog Olwig

Strangers in Our Midst: The Political Philosophy of Immigration by David Miller
David Owen

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