Being Buddhist in a Christian World: Gender and Community in a Korean American Temple

Being Buddhist in a Christian World: Gender and Community in a Korean American Temple

Pyong Gap Min, Professor of Sociology at Queens College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, reviews three books: (1) Being Buddhist in a Christian World: Gender and Community in a Korean American Temple, (2)  Faithful Generations: Race and New Asian American Churches, and (3) Religion and Immigration: Christian, Jewish, and Muslim Experiences in the United States. The books are about religious practices among contemporary immigrants and their children in the United States. The first book is about how people in the temple find meaning in their lives, with an emphasis on gender differences. The second book is about pan-Asian Protestant churches in California, which have emerged because Asian Protestant immigrants have established ethnic churches, but American-born Asians feel unable to participate due to linguistic and cultural differences, as well as uncomfortable attending White American churches. The third book is about Protestant, Catholic, Jewish and Muslim migration to the United States.

Publication Part Of International Migration Review
Author Names

Being Buddhist in a Christian World: Gender and Community in a Korean American Temple
Book by Sharon Suh, Seattle University

Faithful Generations: Race and New Asian American Churches
Book by Russell Jeung, San Francisco State University

Religion and Immigration: Christian, Jewish, and Muslim Experiences in the United States
Edited by Yvonne Yatzbeck Haddad (Georgetown University), Jane I. Smith (Hartford Seminary), and John L. Esposito (Georgetown University)

Reviewed by Pyong Gap Min, Queens College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York

Journal International Migration Review
Date of Publication Winter 2006
Pages 974-978
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-7379.2006.050_2.x
Volume 40
Issue Number 4