Producing and Negotiating Non-Citizenship: Precarious Legal Status in Canada and Irregular Migrant Domestic Workers in Europe: Who Cares?

Producing and Negotiating Non-Citizenship: Precarious Legal Status in Canada and Irregular Migrant Domestic Workers in Europe: Who Cares?

Kathryn Tomko Dennler, a PhD candidate at York University reviews Producing and Negotiating Non-Citizenship: Precarious Legal Status in Canada, edited by Luin Goldring and Patricia Landolt, and Irregular Migrant Domestic Workers in Europe: Who Cares?  edited by Anna Triandafyllidou. The book edited by Goldring & Landolt deals with the precarity experienced by irregular workers in Canada from three angles: its historical and legal production, its lived experience, and the contestation of non-citizenship by institutional actors. Triandafyllidou’s book examines the structural conditions that generate demand for migrant domestic workers and the resulting system in which those workers are made to be extremely vulnerable to exploitation. The research in both books indicates that states often create and tolerate structural constraints that diminish the agency and well-being of migrants. Both also examine migrant rights, access to services, family life and career paths.

Publication Part Of International Migration Review
Author Names

Producing and Negotiating Non-Citizenship: Precarious Legal Status in Canada
Edited by Luin Goldring (York University) and Patricia Landolt (University of Toronto, Scarsborough)

Irregular Migrant Domestic Workers in Europe
Edited by Anna Triandafyllidou, European University Institute

Reviewed by Kathryn Tomko Dennler, York University

Journal International Migration Review
Date of Publication Spring 2014
Pages 278-279
DOI 10.1111/imre.12079
Volume 48
Issue Number 1