JOURNAL ON MIGRATION AND HUMAN SECURITY
SPECIAL COLLECTION

The Law That Begot the Modern US Immigration Enforcement System: IIRIRA 20 Years Later

December 2018

Credit: Sherry V Smith / Shutterstock

JMHS Special Collection | The Law That Begot the Modern US Immigration Enforcement System: IIRIRA 20 Years Later

The Center for Migration Studies (CMS) announces the release of The Law That Begot the Modern US Immigration Enforcement System: IIRIRA 20 Years Later, a special collection of the Journal on Migration and Human Security (JMHS). This collection assesses the multifaceted consequences of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (IIRIRA) by examining the political conditions that gave rise to IIRIRA and the Act’s impact on immigrants, families, communities, and the US immigration system. The special collection features papers that bring a legal, historical, and policy view of IIRIRA’s role in the criminalization of immigrants, the expansion of immigration enforcement and detention, the informalization of removal, and the creation of barriers to family reunification. Authors in this collection include Donald Kerwin, Patrisia Macias-Rojas, Leisy Abrego, Mat Coleman, Daniel E. Martinez, Cecilia Menjivar, Jeremy Slack, Michael Coon, Melina Juarez, Barbara Gomez-Aguinaga, Sonia P. Bettez, Dora Schriro, Saba Ahmed, Adina Appelbaum, Rachel Jordan, Jane Lilly Lopez, Eleanor Acer, and Olga Byrne.

Download the full digital edition for free at http://bit.ly/jmhsiirira.

Request free print copies by emailing jmhs@cmsny.org.

Journal Journal on Migration and Human Security
Date of Publication December 2018
Pages S1-S206