North America

North America

Migration Experts Series | Michael Doyle
Michael W. Doyle is the Director of the Columbia Global Policy Initiative and University Professor of Columbia University, affiliated with the School of International and Public Affairs, the Department of Political Science, and the Law School. At Columbia, he co-directs...

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A Sad Day for Dreamers and US Citizens
In the past weeks, communities in Texas and Louisiana suffered the loss of life and property to a degree that most of us will never experience. This seemed like an once-in-a-lifetime disaster. Yet, on Tuesday, September 5, 2017, the Trump...

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Fate of Dreamers Will Test the Character of Our Nation
President Donald Trump’s decision to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which temporarily protects from deportation close to 800,000 young immigrants – known as Dreamers – brought to this country as children, marks a point of demarcation...

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Responding to Hurricane Harvey and Other Natural Disasters
Hurricane Harvey has caused catastrophic flooding in Texas, forcing thousands from their homes. Many of its survivors are desperate for shelter, food, and other forms of assistance. Among the most vulnerable are the hundreds of thousands of immigrants living in...

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The Future of the DACA Program and the Interests at Stake
Ten state attorneys general have announced that they intend to sue the federal government to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program if the Trump administration does not rescind the program by September 5th.  The DACA program, created...

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Juan Osuna
Juan Osuna, a beloved member of the immigrant justice community, passed away on August 15, 2017.  Over a 17-year period, Juan worked for the US Department of Justice (DOJ) under four administrations in positions of increasing responsibility and importance. He...

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Matching Systems for Refugees
The paper addresses how to match refugees — who have been approved for resettlement — to particular areas, arguing for the importance of accounting for refugee preferences. It finds that matching systems between refugees and states or local areas are emerging as one of the most promising solutions to this question. This paper describes the basics of two-sided matching theory used in a number of allocation problems, such as school choice, where both sides need to agree to the match. It then examines how these insights can be applied to refugee matching in the context of the European Union, and explores how refugee matching might work in the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States.

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