Data Tables Offer Detailed Characteristics of Temporary Protection Status Recipients from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti by State

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Data Tables Offer Detailed Characteristics of Temporary Protection Status Recipients from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti by State

The Center for Migration Studies (CMS) recently released a report providing detailed estimates on Temporary Protected Status (TPS) recipients from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti.

The report found:

  • The labor force participation rate of the TPS population from the three nations ranges from 81 to 88 percent, which is well above the rate for the total US population (63 percent) and the foreign-born population (66 percent).
  • The five leading industries in which TPS beneficiaries from these countries work are: construction (51,700), restaurants and other food services (32,400), landscaping services (15,800), child day care services (10,000), and grocery stores (9,200).
  • TPS recipients from these countries live in 206,000 households: 61,100 of these households (roughly 30 percent) have mortgages.
  • About 68,000, or 22 percent, of the TPS population from these nations arrived as children under the age of 16.
  • TPS beneficiaries from these nations have an estimated 273,000 US citizen children (born in the United States).
  • Ten percent of El Salvadoran, nine percent of the Haitian, and six percent of the Honduran TPS beneficiaries are married to a legal resident.
  • More than one-half of El Salvadoran and Honduran, and 16 percent of the Haitian TPS beneficiaries have resided in the United States for 20 years or more.
  • The six US states with the largest TPS populations from these countries are California (55,000), Texas (45,000), Florida (45,000), New York (26,000), Virginia (24,000), and Maryland (23,000).
  • Eighty-seven percent of the TPS population from these countries speaks at least some English, and slightly over one-half speak English well, very well, or only English.
  • About 27,000, or 11 percent, of those in the labor force are self-employed, having created jobs for themselves and likely for others as well.

To further illustrate its findings, CMS has released several tables (below) that display detailed characteristics of TPS recipients from the three nations (individually and collectively) and  by US state.  These characteristics include:

  • The number of US-born children of TPS recipients;
  • The percentage of TPS recipients who identify as male;
  • The percentages and numbers of TPS recipients in the labor force and who are self-employed;
  • The numbers of TPS recipients who are age 16 and over, age 16 and over and employed,  and age 16 and over and self-employed;
  • The percentage of TPS recipients above the poverty level;
  • The percentage of TPS recipients with health insurance;
  • The numbers of households of TPS recipients with mortgages; and,
  • The average years of residence in the United States of TPS recipients.