New from IMR

Education, Political Participation, and the Determinants of Migration

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New from IMR: Education, Political Participation, and the Determinants of Migration

The Fall 2019 edition of the International Migration Review (IMR) is now available online and in print through paid or institutional subscription. This edition is sorted thematically into four sections. The first section focuses on economic outcomes. The second section has articles that examine schooling and social outcomes, including an article on left-behind children’s school enrollment in Burkina Faso, Kenya, and Senegal. The third section analyzes migrant political participation. The fourth section features two articles about risk, one about Bangladeshi workers and one about remittance behaviors in Fujian, China. Lastly, this edition has four new book reviews, which are free to access.

Educational Selectivity of Migrants and Current School Enrollment of Children Left behind: Analyses in Three African Countries
Sophia Chae, Jennifer E. Glick

Migration of household members is often undertaken to improve the well-being of individuals remaining in the household. This article examines the research that has demonstrated inconsistent associations between migration and children’s well-being across sending areas and types of migration. To understand the degree to which different types of migration and migrants are associated with schooling, the article analyzes comparable data across three African countries differing in prevalence, type, and selectivity of migration. Results suggest that recent migration is differentially associated with left-behind children’s school enrollment across settings. When analyses are restricted to migrant-sending households, however, migrant selectivity is positively associated with school enrollment.

Do Migrants Think Differently? Evidence from Eastern European and Post-Soviet States
Ruxanda Berlinschi, Ani Harutyunyan

This research investigates migrant self-selection on values, beliefs, and attitudes using data from Eastern European and former Soviet countries. It finds that individuals who intend to emigrate are more politically active, more critical of governance and institutions, more tolerant toward other cultures, less tolerant of cheating, more optimistic, and less risk averse. With the exception of risk aversion, all selection patterns are heterogeneous across regions of origin. On the other hand, no self-selection pattern is detected on education, willingness to pay for public goods, and economic liberalism. These findings provide new insights into the determinants of international migration and reveal some of its less known consequences, such as a possible reduction of domestic pressure for political improvements in post-Soviet states due to politically active citizens’ higher propensity to emigrate.

ECONOMIC OUTCOMES ACROSS IMMIGRANT TYPES AND DESTINATIONS

Brain Gain or Brain Waste? Horizontal, Vertical, and Full Job-Education Mismatch and Wage Progression among Skilled Immigrant Men in Canada
Rupa Banerjee, Anil Verma, Tingting Zhang

Port-of-Entry Neighborhood and Its Effects on the Economic Success of Refugees in Sweden
Roger Andersson, Sako Musterd, George Galster

Open Borders, Transport Links, and Local Labor Markets
Olof Åslund, Mattias Engdahl

SCHOOLING AND SOCIAL OUTCOMES IN MIGRANT HOUSEHOLDS

Educational Selectivity of Migrants and Current School Enrollment of Children Left behind: Analyses in Three African Countries
Sophia Chae, Jennifer E. Glick

Determinants of Psycho-Social Adaptation in the Spanish Second Generation: A Fixed-Effects Analysis
Erik R. Vickstrom, Alejandro Portes

MIGRANT POLITICAL PARTICIPATION AT HOME AND ABROAD

Does International Migration Affect Political Participation? Evidence from Multiple Data Sources across Mexican Municipalities, 1990–2013
Lauren Duquette-Rury, Zhenxiang Chen

Do Migrants Think Differently? Evidence from Eastern European and Post-Soviet States
Ruxanda Berlinschi, Ani Harutyunyan

Ideological Affiliations, Conflicts, and Competing Mobilization Frames: The Role of Pro-immigrant Allies in Shaping Immigrant Struggles for Greater Rights
Teresa M. Cappiali

MIGRATION, RISK, AND REWARD AT HOME AND ABROAD

Migration as a Risky Enterprise: A Diagnostic for Bangladesh
Narayan Das, Alain de Janvry, Sakib Mahmood, Elisabeth Sadoulet

Remittance Behaviors of International Migrants in Comparative Perspective: The Case in Fujian, China
Qian Song, Zai Liang

BOOK REVIEWS

Book Review: Migrant Longing: Letter Writing across the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands
Martin Lopez-Galicia

Book Review: On the Shoulders of Grandmothers: Gender, Migration, and Post-Soviet Nation-State Building
Alexander Tymczuk

Book Review: Becoming Refugee American: the Politics of Rescue in Little Saigon
Mai-Linh K. Hong

Book Review: Beyond Expectations: Second-Generation Nigerians in the United States and Britain
Amon Emeka