Development

Development

International Migration Policy Report: Responsibility Sharing for Large Movements of Refugees and Migrants in Need of Protection
This inaugural report of the Scalabrini migration study centers covers responsibility-sharing for large-scale refugee and migrant populations in need. The report consists of chapters that describe the situation of refugee and migrant populations in select regions around the world and analyzes the responses of states, regional bodies and the international community.

Read More

The Global Compact on Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration: Issues to Consider

The adoption of the New York Declaration on the Large Movements of Refugees and Migrants by the United Nations (UN) General Assembly on September 19 has launched a new process to negotiate two compacts by 2018: the Global Compact on Refugees and the Global Compact on Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration (hereinafter referred to as the Global Compact on Migration). Agreeing to a new Global Compact on Refugees should be challenging enough, but reaching an agreement on a Global Compact on Migration will require skill, patience, and, above all, compromise…

Read More

Keumjae Park of William Patterson University reviews Global Talent: Skilled Labor as Social Capital in Korea, by Bi-Wook Shin and Joon Nak Choi. The book examines how South Korea can work against its impending “brain drain” crisis by exploring four different groups of...

Read More

On Climate Change, Migration and Policy

I want to highlight the difficulties with understanding mobility in the context of climate change:

First, how can we responsibly deal with the multi-causal nature of population movements? Can we even talk of “climate change-induced displacement or migration?” We know that decisions to move are rarely mono-causal and that the line between “voluntary” and “forced” is often quite blurry. 

Secondly, there is no consensus in our field about the appropriate terms to use about the people we are talking about. 

Thirdly, there is the difficulty of how to situate those who move because of the effects of climate change in the broader context of population movements undertaken for other reasons. The fundamental question is: Should people displaced by the effects of climate change receive preferential treatment compared to those displaced by volcanoes or tsunamis, in comparison with those forced to leave their communities because of wars or grinding poverty?

A fourth difficulty in the policy realm is that we really don’t know how many people we are talking about.

Read More

Patricia Landolt of University of Toronto, reviews Latinos: Remaking America, by M. M. Suárez-Orozco, and M. M. Páez. This book questions what academics know and need to know about the Latino population in the United States. The book is broken down into several...

Read More