Report

Report

Statelessness in the United States: A Study to Estimate and Profile the US Stateless Population

This report describes a unique methodology to produce estimates and set forth the characteristics of US residents who are potentially stateless or potentially at risk of statelessness. It also lifts up the voices and challenges of stateless persons, and outlines steps to reduce statelessness and to safeguard the rights of stateless persons in the United States.

As part of the study, CMS developed extensive, well-documented profiles of non-US citizen residents who  are  potentially stateless  or  potentially at  risk  of  statelessness.  It  then  used these profiles to query American Community Survey data in order to develop provisional estimates and determine the characteristics of these populations.

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DACA and the Supreme Court

On June 15, 2012, President Obama announced the establishment of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The program opened a floodgate that allowed thousands of young Americans to pursue higher education, better job opportunities, and deepen their social ties in the country. DACA soon proved to be a program of national scope and importance with life-altering impact for its beneficiaries, their families and communities. This paper provides provides a demographic and social portrait of DACA recipients, which shows their deep level of integration and their extensive ties in US communities. For the report, CMS also interviewed several DACA recipients in the New York metro area on DACA’s impact in their lives and what its termination would entail.

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Proposed Public Charge Rule Would Significantly Reduce Legal Admissions and Adjustment to Lawful Permanent Resident Status of Working Class Persons

On October 10, 2018, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued its long-anticipated proposed rule on inadmissibility on public charge grounds. Under the proposed rule, US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) officers would consider receipt of cash benefits and, in a break from the past, non-cash medical, housing, and food benefits in making public charge determinations. This focuses on the potential effect of the proposed rule on two populations, undocumented immigrants and nonimmigrants that would otherwise be eligible for legal permanent resident (LPR) status based on a legally qualifying relationship to a US citizen or LPR living in their household. This CMS report analyzes how these populations in 2016 would have fared under the proposed rule. After placing the rule in historic context, the paper profiles these two populations and examines the characteristics that would mitigate in favor of and against their inadmissibility. The study offers a snapshot of these two groups based on estimates derived from the 2016 American Community Survey (ACS).

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Communities in Crisis: Interior Removals and Their Human Consequences

The Kino Border Initiative (KBI), CMS, and the Office of Justice and Ecology (OJE) of the Jesuit Conference of Canada and the United States released a new report examining the characteristics of deportees and the effects of deportation. This report details findings from the CRISIS Study (Catholic Removal Impact Survey in Society), which interviewed deportees at KBI’s migrant shelter in Nogales, Sonora, and those affected by deportation in Catholic parishes in Florida, Michigan, and Minnesota. The interviews explored: (1) the impact of removals on deportees, their families, and other community members; (2) the deportation process; and (3) the relationship between deportees and their families. The report also includes policy recommendations to mitigate the ill effects of the administration’s policies and promote the integrity of families and communities, including: using detention as a “last resort;” reducing funding to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE); and limiting collaboration between police and ICE and Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

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Work without Justice: Low-Wage Immigrant Laborers
This report explores the plight of low-wage immigrant laborers who play a crucial role in the US economy, but earn subsistence-level wages, receive poor benefits, and face occupational hazards at high rates. It follows immigrant laborers from their countries of...

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Citizenship at Risk: New Obstacles to Naturalization
Citizenship is an integral part of the democratic process, affording rights and privileges, as well as triggering important responsibilities. This report describes the impact of denaturalization on stripping persons of citizenship, as well as the effects of backlogs, poor service,...

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2018 International Migration Policy Report: Perspectives on the Content and Implementation of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration

The global network of seven Scalabrini think tanks on migration released its second international migration policy report, “Perspectives on the Content and Implementation of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration.” The report examines the issues discussed and negotiated by UN member states in developing the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration (“the Compact”). Section 1 explores the issues that have been controversial in negotiations of the Compact and features research on migration challenges, including return migration, labor migration, and unaccompanied migrant children. This section also offers recommendations for how to resolve these issues and ensure the Compact’s successful implementation. Section 2 showcases short essays addressing “on the ground” issues confronting migrants in vulnerable situations, with a focus on how faith-based organizations help fill service and protection gaps. Finally, section 3 presents the numerous interventions made by Scalabrini International Migration Network (SIMN) and CMS during the consultation and negotiation phase of the Compact.

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